Tag: Software

In the current tech scene, it has become common practice to refer to programmers as engineers. It seems that if you aren't part of sales or marketing teams you are now entitled to being designated as an engineer. However, what has been forgotten over the 50 years of looking to turn software development into a legitimate engineering practice, is that we still haven't reached the aspiration of being just that: a legitimate engineering practice. Traditional engineers have to go through stringent regulation, certification, and apprenticeships in order to gain the title. This creates an implicit responsibility of providing reliability and public safety. Software development hasn't reached this point yet - software quality and standards are not universally valued.

So why is the tech industry using the engineering title to describe its technical workers?

Faltering Software Quality and Standards: Why Programmers Should Stop Calling Themselves Engineers

They say “if something works, don’t fix it.” This old adage may be the reason behind why some organizations hold onto legacy systems longer than they should, but it is also the reason why these same organizations struggle with software complexity. In fact, according to the GAO, Uncle Sam spends 80 percent of its $86.4 billion IT budget on legacy systems.

Digital Transformation Keeps Software Complexity from Becoming a CIO’s Legacy

Large and small enterprises have continually struggled with finding a way to manage the software risk inherent in their ever-increasing application portfolio. And now, in a year where companies such as NASDAQ, Knight Capital, American Airlines, and BATS have suffered costly and embarrassing IT failures, software risk is top of mind for every IT executive.

Highlight Update Brings Rapid Portfolio Analysis to the Masses
This interview will focus on the ground-level steps that should be taken in order to help IT teams deal with their Technical Debt in a pragmatic and efficient way, while working in a fast-paced Agile environment.
Pragmatic Ways for Your IT Team to Deal with Technical Debt

Here’s a poster for you to celebrate the Fourth of July in the way only a mature development team can appreciate.

Some advice for the Fourth of July

Before I could enjoy my Father’s Day brunch this past weekend, I found myself with a list of things to do around the house – cleaning out the garage, vacuuming the car, replacing our mailbox which “someone” in my family (not me) ran over. The latter of these tasks, of course, required that I go out and purchase some tools and supplies – a new post, new box, numbers for the box and a post digger - to get the job done.

Who’s Minding the Store?

Developing software, like almost any facet of business, often can be overtaken by some rather sinful thoughts and actions. This is why I really enjoyed a recent post on GigaOm by Magne Land, scrum master and tech lead at RightScale who compares issues within software development to the “Seven Deadly Sins.”

Overcoming the Need for Greed

We’re a society that is always looking for the “next big thing.”

Just check out the TV listings. We tune in to find out who will be the “Next Top Model,” “Next Food Network Star,” “Next Design Star” and “Next Iron Chef.” Technology is also quite interested in “The Next Big Thing” as witnessed by the 19.9 million results you get when you Google “Next Big Thing in Technology.” But while most of the TV “Next” searches focus on the individual, most of the “next big things” discussed in Tech have been on a trend level.

Next AppDev Star

I hate Geometry.

Actually, I do not hate the concept of Geometry – I’m rather partial to shapes and appreciate the need to calculate the areas, perimeters, volumes, et al that they represent. What I hate about the subject – or should I say “hated” (past tense) since I haven’t had a Geometry class since the mid-1980’s – were the proofs I had to do in order to get full credit for my work.

Will the REAL Agile Please Stand Up?

On a recent trip to Paris, I needed a break from the classic French cuisine. My stomach grumbled as I walked along the Marais, I encountered a line of people standing outside a restaurant. Now, I knew nothing about this place but I put my faith in the wisdom of crowds. It turned out to be an Israeli restaurant that specialized in falafel.  Actually, "The World’s Greatest Falafel," according to Lenny Kravitz (as the tattered green sign posted on the wall claimed).

The Value of Customer Satisfaction

One of the oldest conversations on record is the discussion of how to measure effective software development. One of the most used, most abused and least understood metric is “velocity.” Think Corvettes versus Volkswagens.

Just to keep terms straight, velocity is the sum of the estimates of delivered/accepted features per iteration. Velocity can be measured in the same units as feature estimates, whether this is story points, days, ideal days or hours.

The Speed of Diligence

After listening for many years about the European debt crisis, the downgrading of U.S. debt and every other tale of woe about debt, I believe my patience is owed an enormous debt...and seeing as today is my birthday I would like it paid off immediately!

Stop Passing the Buck on Technical Debt

My wife often jokes that we had a child for the sole purpose of giving me a good reason to read Dr. Seuss' books on a regular basis. When she does this I object- vehemently; she is absolutely wrong! I would most definitely read Dr. Seuss whether or not I had a child.

Will You Source Them Here or There

Recently, @dangerroom posted about a computer virus infecting the software that manages the U.S. Air Force’s Predator and Raptor drones -- the ones that perform reconnaissance and attack insurgents in Afghanistan, Iraq and other hot spots. The software hasn’t prevented the drone program from continuing, but so far the Air Force has resisted attempts to remove it.

What We Don't Know is Hurting Us

Kudos to Roger Sessions, the CTO of ObjectWatch. Recently, Sessions took a stand supporting “the intentional architectural design of simplicity into a software application,” which he dubbed “simplility.”

Sealed with a K.I.S.S.: Keeping IT Software Simple