Tag: Technical Debt

In 2015 there was a major slew of headlines dedicated to software failures at major companie which led to a discussion of best practices for software development.
Improving Software Quality to Avoid System Failure
Vision is a term often employed to describe leaders: i.e "they have vision" or "they are visionaries".
How Technical Debt Can Help You Be Innovative
In this great podcast from .Net Rocks! the discussion on how to handle technical debt takes an interesting turn towards the discrepancy in communication between different stakeholders on a software project.
Technical Debt and Breaking Down "Tribal Speak"
Often times in the development process large amounts of technical debt result in stalled innovation from a given team.
How Innovation Debt Is Just As Damaging as Technical Debt
In this post from InfoQ, Thomas Bradford explains his experience on working with a monolith java-based system that had improper test coverage and huge technical debt.
Maintaining Technical Debt and Team Morale in a Large System
Much of what comes with being an entrepreneurial leader is knowing when to accept certain tradeoffs.
When You Should Start Paying Off Your Technical Debt
It has become a recent practice in organizations to measure technical debt in their software.
The Risks of Measuring Technical Debt
Technical debt is a very important concept to developers that is often lost on the management end. Developers use the concept to describe the consequences of a pressure to meet deadlines.
Technical Debt and Risk: One and the Same
It's estimated that the federal government spends about $80 billion a year on IT.
Technical Debt & Software Quality Tools
There is always a battle between the amount of time you have to get things done and the amount of work you have to do to get those things done. There is usually less time than what you need to complete all that work. This time vs. work dynamic is what creates technical debt. Hitting a release deadline is often valued over writing clean code, which leads to technical debt build up. This means the next release you are working on is going to take longer, leading you to take on more debt. A cycle like this is dangerous because it leads to poorly constructed code and can even result in system failures.
Defining Technical Debt: What It Is and What It Is Not
In the development cycle there are many places where technical debt can rear its head and cause problems down the line for the product you’re developing. In order to tackle the problem of technical debt first teams need to know what it’s comprised of, how to identify it, and, then, how to address it’s presence in a system.
The Symptoms and Causes of Technical Debt

Legacy Code

When a business develops software, new technologies eventually outgrow the software. But that doesn’t mean the software stops working, which is why businesses continue to use legacy software. In fact, after all the fixes and patches, the legacy software still gets used because it simply works, even if it means the users are forced to run older operating systems and older web browsers to use it.

Measuring Legacy Systems for Technical Debt and Quality
Ward Cunningham introduced the technical debt metaphor as a method to highlight the potential for higher costs in product development from postponing some work on software in order to release other parts faster. The comparison between financial debt and the term technical debt was meant to demonstrate the eventual need to complete postponed work and repay the principal of delaying it. Technical debt also alludes to the possibility that interest costs, associated to postponed work, can become so high that they impede any other important work from being done on a project. For these reasons, technical debt is a useful concept – as it clearly communicates the danger of postponing work. However, metaphors often conflate two comparable situations, to two identical treatments of similar situations. This can be avoided in the financial debt/technical debt coupling, by using the financial metaphor to identify the economic forces behind technical debt.
The Economics of Technical Debt

CAST ha partecipato al 1° Evento Metrico 2015 organizzato dal GUFPI ISMA, associazione di riferimento nazionale per la misurazione del software in Italia, tenuto a Roma lo scorso 14 Maggio. La conferenza ha visto la partecipazione di Cast sui seguenti 3 topics:

Key Points dal 1° Evento Metrico 2015 GUFPI ISMA
Corporate technology debt (which we will refer to as technical debt) is usually the result of not considering the future effort needed after shortcuts misfire. Recently, CFOs have been taking on the responsibility of IT function, with some IT departments reporting directly to the CFO or relying on them for spending approval. Therefore, awareness of technical debt is necessary for these CFOs. Finance executives, however, will have a different perspective on technical debt than those in IT. For them, technical debt is threatening because it can results in dollars worth of lost opportunities.
A Scorecard for Technical Debt
Technical debt is defined, in this post, as any code that impedes agility as a project matures. This is an important definition to keep in mind as the following attitude towards technical debt is discussed.
Is The Impact Of Technical Debt The Same Everywhere?
This post is based on an interesting paper about managing technical debt at Google.
Managing Technical Debt At Google
Here is a post that discusses why and how product managers must access and manage technical debt. Technical debt often first considered as solely theory, until the pressures of time and customer desires create the need for compromise and quick and dirty shortcuts. Once the results of these pressures start to build up and create an amount of technical debt that demands a solution.
Technical Debt: A Framework for Product Managers