Tag: Software

November’s most popular day in the United States is arguably the fourth Thursday of the month – Thanksgiving Day. In the Tech industry, however, it is the second Tuesday of the month – yesterday to be exact – that garners heightened interest. The reason for the additional interest is that the second Tuesday of the month means Microsoft Patch Tuesday.

And this month in particular there was a bit more interest in Patch Tuesday than is ordinary, only the added interest was not due to the patches released by Microsoft; in fact, those were quite light. It was a kernel patch NOT released that drew the greatest attention.

Microsoft Ducks Duqu

For those of us who remember the 90's, two lessons stand out that would be wise to heed in today's highly interconnected technology kitchen:

You Are What You Eat: Secrets to Healthy IT

We know there’s “no such thing as a free lunch,” that “freedom isn’t free” and that if you get something for free, you probably got what you paid for. Even in the tech industry, when we talk about open source software, we immediately think “free”, yet instantly jump to the old caveat of “think free speech, not free beer,” the idea there being that open source is the layer-by-layer developed product of well-intentioned developers seeking to produce high quality software that competes with established applications.

Sibling Rivalry: Code Quality & Open Source

In the spirit of "Bull Durham", "The Natural" and "Field of Dreams", the upcoming movie, "Moneyball", looks to be the next great American baseball film. I am excited yet conflicted. I am a big fan of those movies but I happen to be a bigger fan of Michael Lewis’ book upon which the movie is based. And I am concerned that Hollywood will sift past Lewis’ exhaustive research, dodge his insightful observations and a string together a few pieces of Billy Beane’s life in the hopes of creating a romantic sports movie (a spormance).

Does Moneyball Play in the Corporate World?

I’m strictly an “American Car” guy. Every car I’ve ever owned since my 1988 Ford Escort when I was in college has been American made.

It’s not so much that I’m “gung-ho” pro-Union or some staunch advocate of only buying products made in the USA – although if two products were comparable I’d probably give the “Made in the USA” label the nod. Honestly, I’ve looked at foreign vehicles when car shopping, but the best deals I've found continue to come from my local Ford dealer.

Software Quality Haunts Honda

Since his surprise resignation as CEO of Apple last week, there have been a plethora of tributes to Steve Jobs and I have enjoyed learning about this iconic figure from his colleagues, employees, journalists and consumers. However, while reading them, something struck me as odd. These tributes supported my personal view of Mr. Jobs as a hard-headed innovator and master designer but, reading through these testimonies and memories, I realized that innovation and design were the products of another characteristic: Quality.

Is Being Like Steve Jobs Easier Than We Think?

Agile development celebrates a half-birthday this month, so I figured it was time to reflect upon my comments a few months ago when I took it to task for not taking software quality more seriously.

More on Agile at 10…and a Half

“S” stands for security, something “S” organizations like Sony and Sega appeared to have too little of earlier this year. You could also say “S” represents the U.S. Dollar sign ($) that is associated with the FDIC and IRS, both of which have recently fallen victim to phishing attacks and have had their security compromised. Unfortunately, they are not alone; organizations that start with many letters of the alphabet have fallen victim to security issues this year.

Sunny Day, Sweepin’ the Hacks Away

There’s a huge dichotomy in how the private and public sectors address security breaches.

Execution of Government IT: I’m All For It!

In this week’s episode of the IT Software Quality Report, CISQ director Dr. Bill Curtis interviews industry luminary, Capers Jones, about his new book, “The Economics of Software Quality," co-written by Olivier Bonsignour and recently published by Addison-Wesley. Jones has been involved in software quality issues for more than 40 years, since he worked at IBM.

The Real Economics of Software Quality

A couple weeks back I read the most vastly understated opening line of a blog that I’ve seen in the six months since I began blogging here on OnQuality.

Blogger @tadanderson, a .NET architect by trade, recently opened a post on his Real World Software Architecture blog by noting, “Finding the perfect balance of influence between IT and the Business Owners… is not easy.”

Technical Debt Gets the Message Across

I’m a big fan of things that make sense. Simple explanations, using metaphors to explain the otherwise inexplicable, incorporating landmarks into driving directions and splitting up large projects to get them done faster are all concepts with which I find favor.

This is why, when I first learned about Scrum, it seemed like a valid way to develop software faster, or at least more efficiently. In my mind, it made sense that if you were to build multiple parts of a single application simultaneously and then bring them together, the final product could be built much faster.

Unscrambling Scrum

Whenever a company chooses to outsource, there is a certain relinquishment of control. It is simply neither possible nor desirable to hold tightly to the reins of all aspects of an outsourced project. It stands to reason, therefore, that studies in the industry have revealed that many in IT management either are dissatisfied with their outsourcers or feel their outsourcers have “made up” work to pad their billings.

New Partnership CASTs Eye on Outsourcing