Tag: software measurement

Automated Function Points Provide Data-Driven Captives Management

Last month in this space I wrote about the importance of optimizing the cost-effectiveness of Captives (i.e., Global In-House Centers) by setting metrics and enhancing process transparency for better management of them. For these management methods to work, though, an organization needs to employ automated function points as a way to way to gain insight about current costs and supplied value, which can then be used to enhance received output from current or future providers.

VIDEO: IT Expert Calls Upon Automated Function Points for Vendor Management

Barbara Beech, an expert in the field of IT development for telecommunications companies, recently spoke to CAST in a video chat about her experience using software analysis and measurement as well as automated function points to gain visibility into IT vendor deliverables.

As a solution to gaining visibility into IT vendor deliverables, Beech points to the CAST Automated Function Points (AFP) capability – an automatic function points counting method that is based on rules defined by the International Function Point User Group (IFPUG). CAST automates the manual counting process by using the structural information retrieved by source code analysis, database structure and transactions.

CISQ Hosts IT Risk Management & Cybersecurity Summit

The Consortium for IT Software Quality (CISQ), will host an IT Risk Management and Cybersecurity Summit on March 24 at the OMG Technical Meeting at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Reston, VA. The CISQ IT Risk Management and Cybersecurity Summit will address issues impacting software quality in the Federal sector, including: Managing Risk in IT Acquisition, Targeting Security Weakness, Complying with Legislative Mandates, Using CISQ Standards to Measure Software Quality, and Agency Implementation Best Practices.

  • Do I look like someone who needs representative measures?

    No offense, but I’m not addicted to representative measures. In some areas, I am more than happy to have them. Like when talking about the balance of my checking and savings accounts. In that case, I’d like representative measures, to the nearest cent.

    But I don't need representative measures 100 percent of the time. On the contrary, in. some areas, I strongly need non-representative measures to provide me with some efficient guidance

  • Efficiency: The Need for Speed and Robustness

  • Cracking Open the Black Box of IT for CEOs

  • The Personnel Side of Technical Debt

    I have been an East-Coaster all my life. I’ve lived, worked and even attended college in states that all lie East of the Mississippi. However, throughout my 18 years working in the technology business, my clients have been spread out around the U.S. and abroad. I’ve found myself doing phone calls before the sun rises and well after it has set. That’s just the way it is in this business.

  • Who’s Minding the Store?

    Before I could enjoy my Father’s Day brunch this past weekend, I found myself with a list of things to do around the house – cleaning out the garage, vacuuming the car, replacing our mailbox which “someone” in my family (not me) ran over. The latter of these tasks, of course, required that I go out and purchase some tools and supplies – a new post, new box, numbers for the box and a post digger - to get the job done.

  • Done Off-Site, Done Right

  • Overcoming the Need for Greed

    Developing software, like almost any facet of business, often can be overtaken by some rather sinful thoughts and actions. This is why I really enjoyed a recent post on GigaOm by Magne Land, scrum master and tech lead at RightScale who compares issues within software development to the “Seven Deadly Sins.”

  • De-Stressing over Software

  • Next AppDev Star

    We’re a society that is always looking for the “next big thing.”

    Just check out the TV listings. We tune in to find out who will be the “Next Top Model,” “Next Food Network Star,” “Next Design Star” and “Next Iron Chef.” Technology is also quite interested in “The Next Big Thing” as witnessed by the 19.9 million results you get when you Google “Next Big Thing in Technology.” But while most of the TV “Next” searches focus on the individual, most of the “next big things” discussed in Tech have been on a trend level.

  • Did NASDAQ's App Glitch Cause FB's IPO Hitch?

  • Fix a Hole, Stop a Bug

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