Tag: software development

A couple weeks back I read the most vastly understated opening line of a blog that I’ve seen in the six months since I began blogging here on OnQuality.

Blogger @tadanderson, a .NET architect by trade, recently opened a post on his Real World Software Architecture blog by noting, “Finding the perfect balance of influence between IT and the Business Owners… is not easy.”

Technical Debt Gets the Message Across

I’m a big fan of things that make sense. Simple explanations, using metaphors to explain the otherwise inexplicable, incorporating landmarks into driving directions and splitting up large projects to get them done faster are all concepts with which I find favor.

This is why, when I first learned about Scrum, it seemed like a valid way to develop software faster, or at least more efficiently. In my mind, it made sense that if you were to build multiple parts of a single application simultaneously and then bring them together, the final product could be built much faster.

Unscrambling Scrum

Whenever a company chooses to outsource, there is a certain relinquishment of control. It is simply neither possible nor desirable to hold tightly to the reins of all aspects of an outsourced project. It stands to reason, therefore, that studies in the industry have revealed that many in IT management either are dissatisfied with their outsourcers or feel their outsourcers have “made up” work to pad their billings.

New Partnership CASTs Eye on Outsourcing

As you may know from my bio here, I’m a big fan of Boston sports. So you can understand how thrilled I was a few weeks ago when “my” Boston Bruins won the Stanley Cup for the first time since I was my daughter’s age!

It wasn’t easy for them, though. Through the first round of the playoffs, they looked like they could be a “one-and-done” team and everybody – including some alleged diehard fans – were already calling for the dismissal of their head coach because of their anemic performance. Nevertheless, they made the necessary adjustments, got some stellar work out of key individuals, overcame a few adversities and in the end proved to be the best team in the National Hockey League this year.

In Defense of Agile

One of my favorite reads among tech bloggers is Dion Hinchcliffe over at ZDNet. I’ve followed his blogs for much of the last five years and whether I agree with him or not, I almost invariably find his points compelling and his willingness not to mince words refreshing; he even makes the occasional light bulb go off in my head.

Structural Quality: The Invisible Hand

Last fall, Gartner’s Andy Kyte issued a wake-up call about technical debt that was akin to a piano being dropped on the head of the IT industry. In estimating that technical debt – the cost to fix the structural quality problems in an application that, if left unfixed, put the business at serious risk – has already reached $500 billion globally and is fast on its way to exceeding $1 trillion by 2015, Kyte stirred up a hornet's nest of activity around the topic.

ID’ing the Debt

It was recently reported that within the next couple months the meteoric rise of Android Market is all but certain to overtake the iPhone App Store in terms of the number of applications offered. Taken on face value, this should come as little surprise to anyone.

Going Gaga over Google

In the Bible, when Moses returns to Mount Sinai after smashing the Ten Commandments, God says to him, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness, maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin. Yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children and their children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation.”

Insight into the Rewrite

System outages, software failures, security breaches and IT maintenance costs are all rapidly on the rise. It seems like not a day goes by that we don’t read about one company or another announcing that their system went down or revealed personal data to hackers. Couple that with published estimates of technical debt at a half-billion dollars globally and $1 million per company and you see that things are getting out of hand. The sad part about it is it doesn’t have to be that way.

CAST Highlight Gives Enterprises a Kick in the Apps

Happy Birthday to Agile Development! You’re 10 years old now; that’s an important age. A lot of things start happening at age 10. The pre-teen years start and things will seem to get awkward. Most important, a lot more will be expected of you.

Agile Turns 10 – Time to Grow Up

There once was a time when "settlers" were a hearty bunch. They were determined, adventurous folks who risked all to head out from their homes in the East to grab a piece of the unknown in the West on the premise of “what might be.”

Quality Doesn’t have to be an Afterthought

Outsourcing is not exactly a new idea. As far back as the 1950’s, companies that found they didn’t have the resources in-house to perform tasks began looking to other individuals and companies to fulfill their needs. It wasn’t until the late 80’s that outsourcing really began to take off as companies turned to “offshoring” of outsourced projects to countries such as China and India in order to take advantage of the savings in labor costs.

IT Outsourcing: Do You Know Where Your Software Is?

It’s nearly impossible these days to pick up a trade publication covering the tech industry without reading something about cloud computing. The plethora of coverage is enough to make one think that cloud computing is the latest technological panacea, good for everything from live data storage to data archiving and all enterprise needs in between.

Who’ll Stop the Rain: Seeking Quality in the Cloud

We’ve known it all along, and now the rest of the Tech industry has been told thanks to the folks at Gartner who earlier this month named us to their “Cool Vendors in Application Services, 2011” report.

Yeah, We’re Cool

In software development, much like in life, a little debt can actually be a good thing to get other more critical things moving. Although in previous blogs we have defined technical debt as “the cost to fix structural quality problems in an application that, if left unfixed, could put the business at risk,” engaging in a small, manageable amount of technical debt can actually make a project move faster and facilitate reaching the objective of executable application software. This was the thought of Ward Cunningham, the originator of the technical debt concept.

But as Derek Huether points out in his technology consulting blog for Dumas Lab regarding technical debt, “Just like regular debt, you’re going to have to pay it back sooner or later. “

Technical Debt: No Penalty for Early Payment

It’s Patch Tuesday again. The monthly rite of passage for Microsoft as it attempts to patch some of the holes in its software that it didn’t bother to fix before they put it in the box as well as those exposed after the software had been installed in millions of devices.

It’s Tuesday; Do You Know Where Your Patches Are?

Last week on the East Coast Main Line, which connects London to Edinburgh, a software malfunction left five trains stranded mid-track and significantly delayed others after a power supply issue knocked out the signaling system. According to reports, software that should have instructed the backup signaling system to kick in failed to function, causing all signals on the line to default to “Red,” halting trains where they stood. The failure left more than 3,000 rail passengers stranded or delayed for more than five hours on a Saturday afternoon.

When Good Software Goes Bad