Tag: software development

p>Last week, CAST issued a report on the summary findings of its second annual CAST Report on Application Software Health (aka CRASH), which delves into the structural quality of business application software. The report has earned significant coverage throughout the technology media, including InformationWeek, InfoWorld and Computerworld, as well as the Wall Street Journal.

A Crash Course on CAST’s New CRASH Report

As we all know, Sundays are for football, and this past Sunday brought some choice matchups. Although I am a devout fan of the New England Patriots, one of my favorite games paired the undefeated Green Bay Packers, led by quarterback Aaron Rodgers, and Eli Manning's New York Giants. Tied with less than two minutes to go in regulation, Rodgers did his best Tom Brady imitation, leading his team on a spectacularly engineered drive that preserved their as-yet unblemished record.

What the New York Giants Can Teach Us about Software Quality

Kudos to Roger Sessions, the CTO of ObjectWatch. Recently, Sessions took a stand supporting “the intentional architectural design of simplicity into a software application,” which he dubbed “simplility.”

Sealed with a K.I.S.S.: Keeping IT Software Simple

November’s most popular day in the United States is arguably the fourth Thursday of the month – Thanksgiving Day. In the Tech industry, however, it is the second Tuesday of the month – yesterday to be exact – that garners heightened interest. The reason for the additional interest is that the second Tuesday of the month means Microsoft Patch Tuesday.

And this month in particular there was a bit more interest in Patch Tuesday than is ordinary, only the added interest was not due to the patches released by Microsoft; in fact, those were quite light. It was a kernel patch NOT released that drew the greatest attention.

Microsoft Ducks Duqu

Last week’s admissions of bugs in newly released software by Apple and Google were just the latest reminders that the battle between bringing software products to market quickly and optimizing software quality is coming to a head in a year that has seen far more than its share of software outages, malfunctions and security breaches. Most of these problems have been the direct result of problems with the structural quality of software and have cost the companies hit by them a great deal both financially and in terms of reputation.

Toast, Coffee & Software Quality

Recently, as I sat on the Northeast corridor train, the ticket-taker informed us that we would be delayed 15 minutes. As I thought about the impact on my day, a flutter of activity rippled through the cabin. Passengers called bosses, colleagues, wives and customers spreading the news. What was interesting was that the relayed news was different: some people doubled the time, others bumped it up to solid hour and, shockingly, no one made it shorter.

Transparency is the Track to Trust

For those of us who remember the 90's, two lessons stand out that would be wise to heed in today's highly interconnected technology kitchen:

You Are What You Eat: Secrets to Healthy IT

We know there’s “no such thing as a free lunch,” that “freedom isn’t free” and that if you get something for free, you probably got what you paid for. Even in the tech industry, when we talk about open source software, we immediately think “free”, yet instantly jump to the old caveat of “think free speech, not free beer,” the idea there being that open source is the layer-by-layer developed product of well-intentioned developers seeking to produce high quality software that competes with established applications.

Sibling Rivalry: Code Quality & Open Source

Back in August, "CIO Zone" posted a blog outlining the top five cloud computing trends. Smack-dab in the middle of the top five was this one: "Custom cloud computing services," which delved into how outsourced IT organizations must focus on automated software and become experts in migrating to SaaS, PaaS and IaaS in order to ensure the least painful cloud migrations. It brought to mind how, in an effort to save money, so many businesses blindly hand over their whatever-it-is-to-be-done to outsourcers and hope for the best.

Clouding the Outsourcing Issue

I cannot believe how much our education system has changed. When I went to kindergarten, most of curriculum revolved around getting along with others (a lesson some will argue never took with me) and some basic verbal skills. I learned at my daughter's kindergarten orientation that blocks and finger painting have been replaced by geography, math, science and civics.

Structural Quality Must Be Part of Agile Vocabulary

Bravo to Joe Little, who writes the Agile & Business blog.

Little recently penned a piece about the intersection of Scrum and technical debt titled “Scrum Hates Technical Debt.” I’m sure it does, but I think what he really means is that true Scrum hates technical debt.

Scrum & Technical Debt: Love the One You're With

I’m strictly an “American Car” guy. Every car I’ve ever owned since my 1988 Ford Escort when I was in college has been American made.

It’s not so much that I’m “gung-ho” pro-Union or some staunch advocate of only buying products made in the USA – although if two products were comparable I’d probably give the “Made in the USA” label the nod. Honestly, I’ve looked at foreign vehicles when car shopping, but the best deals I've found continue to come from my local Ford dealer.

Software Quality Haunts Honda