Tag: software development

Before I could enjoy my Father’s Day brunch this past weekend, I found myself with a list of things to do around the house – cleaning out the garage, vacuuming the car, replacing our mailbox which “someone” in my family (not me) ran over. The latter of these tasks, of course, required that I go out and purchase some tools and supplies – a new post, new box, numbers for the box and a post digger - to get the job done.

Who’s Minding the Store?

We’re a society that is always looking for the “next big thing.”

Just check out the TV listings. We tune in to find out who will be the “Next Top Model,” “Next Food Network Star,” “Next Design Star” and “Next Iron Chef.” Technology is also quite interested in “The Next Big Thing” as witnessed by the 19.9 million results you get when you Google “Next Big Thing in Technology.” But while most of the TV “Next” searches focus on the individual, most of the “next big things” discussed in Tech have been on a trend level.

Next AppDev Star

Catchy slogans are catchy for two good reasons – the put an extremely true point into very simple, succinct language. This is probably why they call these true, simple statements, “catch phrases.”

One of the most effective catch phrases of my youth was for a product called Fram Oil Filters. Sometime in the 1970’s, Fram came out with a set of television and radio commercials where a mechanic would explain how a simple thing like replacing your oil filter on a regular basis could prevent major engine problems. The catch phrase uttered by the mechanic at the end of each commercial was, “You can pay me now, or you can pay me later.”

Shortcuts Today Lead to Shortcomings Tomorrow

I love my job!

I’ve always been an avid writer, even as a kid. So when it came to career choices my decision to enter a profession that demanded writing skills seemed like a natural fit.

I started out as a newspaper reporter, following in my father’s footsteps, but as the jobs and money there began drying up in the mid-1990’s I took my interest in Technology and made the jump to writing for high tech companies and have been happy doing this job ever since.

Quality is a Happy Place

I hate Geometry.

Actually, I do not hate the concept of Geometry – I’m rather partial to shapes and appreciate the need to calculate the areas, perimeters, volumes, et al that they represent. What I hate about the subject – or should I say “hated” (past tense) since I haven’t had a Geometry class since the mid-1980’s – were the proofs I had to do in order to get full credit for my work.

Will the REAL Agile Please Stand Up?
There are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies.
Technical Debt vs. ROI: Your Code May Be Elegant…

I’ve never been much of a horror movie fan. I think my deep-seated love and background of history and my fascination for things that are real diminishes my ability to kick back and allow my wits to be uprooted by monsters and other ghoulish figures like Jason from Friday the 13th or Freddie Krueger from Nightmare on Elm Street.

New Year, Same Fear

One of the oldest conversations on record is the discussion of how to measure effective software development. One of the most used, most abused and least understood metric is “velocity.” Think Corvettes versus Volkswagens.

Just to keep terms straight, velocity is the sum of the estimates of delivered/accepted features per iteration. Velocity can be measured in the same units as feature estimates, whether this is story points, days, ideal days or hours.

The Speed of Diligence

Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi once said that "Winning isn't everything; it's the only thing." But decades after Lombardi's Green Bay Packers dominated the NFL, a new slogan joined the sports lexicon - "moral victory."

Mobilizing Security Failure

My father was proud of his military service. He believed that young men and women could learn a lot not only from having served in the armed forces, but from having actually experienced the stress that comes with "taking fire."

Taking Fire over Technical Debt

As a writer, I frequently go back and review pieces I’ve written over time. When I do, I’d like to think that I’ll be happy and satisfied with each and every article, announcement, blog or brochure.

Hey Agile: Good Enough Ain’t Good Enough

Some among us may remember Earl Scheib who owned a chain of auto painting facilities; at least, that's what he called them. In actual fact, his shops were a national joke. In his TV commercials he would tell viewers, “I’ll paint any car for $99.95” and would promise one-day service. He did just that, but as the old saying goes, "You get what you pay for."

Speed Kills