Tag: software development

In this presentation by Kimber Lockhart, as part of the Hack Summit (the virtual conference for programers), she discusses what to do once you’ve inherited bad code. She speaks less about the source of bad code (low budget, high pressure to meet deadlines, company’s decision to hire poor developers) and more on the steps to fix and prevent this code. She does mention that not all bad code is because of technical debt, since for her tech debt comes from a conscious decision to write poor code, but this presentation does address how to get rid of it.
Inheriting Bad Code: How to Fix and Prevent it

What draws me to Anaheim, Calif., in October is not the walking Disney characters (though there are plenty of those), but instead the STARWest, the West Coast’s largest conference on software testing analysis and review.

Executives, Management, and Testers: Are You Aligned?

At a time when other conferences are splitting into smaller and smaller regional and micro-tech events, the Agile Conference, with its 1,700 attendees, stands alone.

Alone and overwhelming. The event had sixteen different tracks spanning everything from DevOps to coaching and mentoring, leadership, and lean startup to classic elements like development, testing, and quality assurance.

Not to mention the vendor booths, the Stalwarts Stage (where experts "just" answered questions for 75 minutes), the four-day boot camp for beginners, and the academic track. The 215 sessions brought one word to mind: overwhelming.

Instead of focusing on one track or concept, I spent my time at the conference looking for themes and patterns. What surprised me was where I found those ideas -- to the left, in product design, and to the right, in DevOps, not in the middle, in classic software.

Extending Agile To The Left

From IT’s perspective, the business is always asking for new applications -- apps to innovate, or simply make their jobs a little easier. The problem is, it always want them done quickly and be up and running perfectly at launch.

Maintaining software quality on the bleeding edge
Steve Garnett from Ripple Rock (an IT consulting company that assists customers in improving their software development capabilities) is one of many who has experienced Technical Debt on a project he worked on in the past. His new blog post captures a common problem: you know the Technical Debt is there, you know that it’s going to be difficult to fix… so how do you convince management that you need the time and resources to deal with it?
Prioritizing Your Technical Debt
This debate will focus on addressing the viewpoints expressed by the founder of the term “Technical Debt,” Ward Cunningham, and those of Capers Jones, which take on a much wider economic approach to the topic.
Technical Debt Debate, with Ward Cunningham & Capers Jones

When my organization decided to hire a new CTO, one of his top priorities was to look through our old support contracts and “cut the fat,” as it were. It was there, among the rubble, where we found a transformational tool that we had cast aside which could help us increase our development productivity and software quality. But in learning more about this tool we found that it hadn’t failed us, but rather, we failed it!

Raymond James’ Aha! Moment with Integrating Software Quality