Tag: Software architecture

How to De-Risk IT Modernization Programs.
Driving Low-Risk Legacy Modernization
Use Software Measurement Best Practices to Support Your Agile Initiatives.
How Software Intelligence Can Save Your Agile Program
How Product Owners and Software Engineers Can Unite Quality and Craft for Improved Business Outcomes.
Melding Software Quality and Software Craftsmanship
Three Cloud Migration Fails to Avoid and How.
Cloud Migration: A Cautionary Tale in Digital Transformation
What new CIOs can learn from the hit TV show, Iron Chef.
CIO Risk Management: Six Software Intelligence Strategies for New CIOs
How to automate software quality discovery and remediation with CAST.
Flying High with Software Intelligence: A Guide for Technical Leads (Part 2)
A while ago we published a post on IDC predictions that the bi-modal IT approach is a recipe for disaster. There are different opinions on what works in software development: those who support the siloed approach of bi-modal IT, those who urge against this division between predicability and innovation, and others who say fast development is the only way. This debate is only just beginning so it's worth while expanding on the arguments surrounding it.
Innovating While Maintaining Stability: A Lesson From Technical Debt

In software maintenance and evolution, it is important to assess both code health and application architecture in order to identify issues impeding software quality goals. One way to move the needle toward software quality is to use Technical Debt (TD) indexing as a method to evaluate development projects.

We recently presented a paper at MTD 2016, the International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt put on by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon, where we discussed the way five different and widely known tools used to compute Technical Debt Indexes (TDI), for example numbers synthesizing the overall quality and/or TD of an analyzed project.

Technical Debt Indexes Provided by Tools: A Preliminary Discussion
Anyone whose professional life has intersected with the technical debt metaphor knows its power: the simple proposition that such a thing exists opens up a new channel of communication among groups (IT and application developers, designers, biz dev) that famously have trouble communicating about technical decisions. Not everyone understands test cases, aging platforms, crufty code bases, or security loopholes, but everyone understands debt (needless to say, most everyone has personal debt, and a sizable proportion of the news media conversation concerns debts, mortgages, and deficits).
Can Technical Debt Be Quantified? The Limits And Promise Of The Metaphor