Tag: software analysis

We just finished up the 30-minute webinar where Dr. Bill Curtis, our Chief Scientist, described some of the findings that are about to be published by CAST Research Labs. The CRASH (CAST Research on Application Software Health) report for 2014 is chock full of new data on software risk, code quality and technical debt. We expect the initial CRASH report to be produced in the next month, and based on some of the inquiries we’ve received so far, we will probably see a number of smaller follow-up studies come out of the 2014 CRASH data.

This year’s CRASH data that we saw Bill present is based on 1316 applications, comprising 706 million lines of code – a pretty large subset of the overall Appmarq repository.  This means the average application in the sample was 536 KLOC. We’re talking big data for BIG apps here. This is by far the biggest repository of enterprise IT code quality and technical debt research data. Some of the findings presented included correlations between the health factors – we learned that Performance Efficiency is pretty uncorrelated to other health factors and that Security is highly correlated to software Robustness. We also saw how the health factor scores were distributed across the sample set and the differences in structural code quality by outsourcing, offshoring, Agile and CMMI level.

CRASH Webinar: Code Quality Q & A Discussion

No offense, but I’m not addicted to representative measures. In some areas, I am more than happy to have them. Like when talking about the balance of my checking and savings accounts. In that case, I’d like representative measures, to the nearest cent.

But I don't need representative measures 100 percent of the time. On the contrary, in. some areas, I strongly need non-representative measures to provide me with some efficient guidance

Do I look like someone who needs representative measures?

Did the press club have a meeting? Because this is the second time in two weeks that we’ve been in the press.

Lev Sits Down with ComputerWeekly to Discuss the Outsourcing of Software Testing

I’ve been asked time and again how CAST is different from performance engineering. And here’s my answer: The CAST discipline of software analysis and measurement versus performance engineering couldn’t be more different. And I’ll explain why and how in a moment. But along with that, it should be noted that they also are like peanut butter and chocolate -- they can go very well together.

Why Performance Engineering Isn't Enough

Risk detection is the most valid justification to the Software Analysis and Measurement activity: identify any threat that can negatively and severely impact the behavior of applications in operations as well as the application maintenance and development activity.

Risk Detection and Benchmarking -- Feuding Brothers?

I have been an East-Coaster all my life. I’ve lived, worked and even attended college in states that all lie East of the Mississippi. However, throughout my 18 years working in the technology business, my clients have been spread out around the U.S. and abroad. I’ve found myself doing phone calls before the sun rises and well after it has set. That’s just the way it is in this business.

The Personnel Side of Technical Debt

I’m not one who believes in fortune tellers or those who claim to be able to predict the future. Heck, I don’t even read my horoscope and cringe whenever someone attempts to force it upon me. Only when my wife has attempted to read me my horoscope have I offered even as much as a polite “hmm.” Nevertheless there are many out there who swear by those who claim to be able to predict the future, especially in the financial industry.

Foretelling Facebook’s IPO Failure

Before I could enjoy my Father’s Day brunch this past weekend, I found myself with a list of things to do around the house – cleaning out the garage, vacuuming the car, replacing our mailbox which “someone” in my family (not me) ran over. The latter of these tasks, of course, required that I go out and purchase some tools and supplies – a new post, new box, numbers for the box and a post digger - to get the job done.

Who’s Minding the Store?

Developing software, like almost any facet of business, often can be overtaken by some rather sinful thoughts and actions. This is why I really enjoyed a recent post on GigaOm by Magne Land, scrum master and tech lead at RightScale who compares issues within software development to the “Seven Deadly Sins.”

Overcoming the Need for Greed

We’re a society that is always looking for the “next big thing.”

Just check out the TV listings. We tune in to find out who will be the “Next Top Model,” “Next Food Network Star,” “Next Design Star” and “Next Iron Chef.” Technology is also quite interested in “The Next Big Thing” as witnessed by the 19.9 million results you get when you Google “Next Big Thing in Technology.” But while most of the TV “Next” searches focus on the individual, most of the “next big things” discussed in Tech have been on a trend level.

Next AppDev Star

Catchy slogans are catchy for two good reasons – the put an extremely true point into very simple, succinct language. This is probably why they call these true, simple statements, “catch phrases.”

One of the most effective catch phrases of my youth was for a product called Fram Oil Filters. Sometime in the 1970’s, Fram came out with a set of television and radio commercials where a mechanic would explain how a simple thing like replacing your oil filter on a regular basis could prevent major engine problems. The catch phrase uttered by the mechanic at the end of each commercial was, “You can pay me now, or you can pay me later.”

Shortcuts Today Lead to Shortcomings Tomorrow

By definition, standards are supposed to be a set of bare minimum requirements for meeting levels of acceptability. In school, the students who took the “standard” level courses were those who were performing “at grade level” and just focused on graduating. Every April in the United States we need to decide whether we will take the “standard deduction” – the bare minimum we can claim for our life’s expenses – or do we have enough to itemize our living expenses and therefore deduce more from our base income before taxes.

Living Up to Standards