Tag: automated analysis and measurement

Look around you. Microsoft says that if you’re among a group of people working on a PC, at least one of you has a machine infected with malware.

Based on statistics gathered by its free scanning tool, Microsoft Safety Scanner, Microsoft reported last month that 5% of computers – one out of every 20 – are infected with malware. The average number of malware applications on each infected machine? Nearly 3.5. With this much malware out there, it’s little wonder we’re seeing such a high number of security breaches at major corporations.

Microsoft Mulls Malware

We woke today to the news that back in March a Pentagon defense contractor was the subject of a cyberattack by an unidentified nation state that resulted in 24,000 sensitive files being stolen.

The Enemy Within

As you may know from my bio here, I’m a big fan of Boston sports. So you can understand how thrilled I was a few weeks ago when “my” Boston Bruins won the Stanley Cup for the first time since I was my daughter’s age!

It wasn’t easy for them, though. Through the first round of the playoffs, they looked like they could be a “one-and-done” team and everybody – including some alleged diehard fans – were already calling for the dismissal of their head coach because of their anemic performance. Nevertheless, they made the necessary adjustments, got some stellar work out of key individuals, overcame a few adversities and in the end proved to be the best team in the National Hockey League this year.

In Defense of Agile

Sony, Sega, RSA, the International Monetary Fund, the Arizona Department of Public Safety, even the CIA. It seems no organization – private or public – is immune to hackers these days.

Hackers are Getting Smarter; are You?

One of my favorite reads among tech bloggers is Dion Hinchcliffe over at ZDNet. I’ve followed his blogs for much of the last five years and whether I agree with him or not, I almost invariably find his points compelling and his willingness not to mince words refreshing; he even makes the occasional light bulb go off in my head.

Structural Quality: The Invisible Hand

Last fall, Gartner’s Andy Kyte issued a wake-up call about technical debt that was akin to a piano being dropped on the head of the IT industry. In estimating that technical debt – the cost to fix the structural quality problems in an application that, if left unfixed, put the business at serious risk – has already reached $500 billion globally and is fast on its way to exceeding $1 trillion by 2015, Kyte stirred up a hornet's nest of activity around the topic.

ID’ing the Debt

It was recently reported that within the next couple months the meteoric rise of Android Market is all but certain to overtake the iPhone App Store in terms of the number of applications offered. Taken on face value, this should come as little surprise to anyone.

Going Gaga over Google

The rate at which security issues have plagued businesses lately is staggering. Every week we hear of multiple vulnerabilities, millions of personal data records being exposed and corporations watching profits dwindle as reparation costs for these breaches extend into millions and even billions of dollars.

Insecure Over Quality

Human beings are an odd animal. We’re the only animal that experiences embarrassment over mistakes; some say we’re the only animal that realizes we make them. We also run a full gamut of emotions when we make mistakes – from frustration and self-deprecation to humor and acceptance.

Developers: They're Only Human

I’ve written quite a bit about the spate of businesses that have suffered some form of disruption over the last few months – security breaches at Sony, Android malware attacks, system outages at the London Stock Exchange, operational system failures on London’s East Coast Line and numerous others. All these cases have had one thing in common: they all have had software structural issues as their root causes.

Managing Risk, Avoiding Disruption

From the earthquake and tsunami in Japan back in March to the tornadoes that have ripped through the Midwestern United States over the last two months, we have been witness to the violence and destruction Mother Nature can inflict without warning.

As we begin to move on from the shock of the destruction wrought by these natural disasters, we turn our attention to the recovery, both in human terms and in terms of business.

Avoid Disaster in Disaster Recovery

The hits keep coming for Sony. Unfortunately for the music label and technology icon, though, its latest hits aren’t the ones that chart on Billboard, but rather the kind that cost it money and give the company a black eye in the media.

Sony: 'Oops!...I did it Again!'

In the Bible, when Moses returns to Mount Sinai after smashing the Ten Commandments, God says to him, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness, maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin. Yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished; he punishes the children and their children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation.”

Insight into the Rewrite

System outages, software failures, security breaches and IT maintenance costs are all rapidly on the rise. It seems like not a day goes by that we don’t read about one company or another announcing that their system went down or revealed personal data to hackers. Couple that with published estimates of technical debt at a half-billion dollars globally and $1 million per company and you see that things are getting out of hand. The sad part about it is it doesn’t have to be that way.

CAST Highlight Gives Enterprises a Kick in the Apps

Happy Birthday to Agile Development! You’re 10 years old now; that’s an important age. A lot of things start happening at age 10. The pre-teen years start and things will seem to get awkward. Most important, a lot more will be expected of you.

Agile Turns 10 – Time to Grow Up

Usage of Google’s Android mobile platform is growing at an exponential rate; unfortunately, so is the malware being developed to attack it.

On Monday came the news of the Malicious Mobile Threats Report 2010/2011, released last week by the Juniper Networks Global Threat Center, that reveals a frightening statistic: since the summer of 2010, “Android malware has surged 400 percent.” What is to blame? According to eWEEK’s Fahmida Y. Rashid, the report cites user naiveté and general nonchalance as a major reason for malware developers putting a big 'bulls-eye' on the Android platform.

All of this begs the question: As Android sales continue to rise at exponential rates and overtake sales of all other smartphone platforms, at what point does someone tell Google it needs to do a better job of policing its app store?

Mobile App Development: Many Questions, Few Answers

There once was a time when "settlers" were a hearty bunch. They were determined, adventurous folks who risked all to head out from their homes in the East to grab a piece of the unknown in the West on the premise of “what might be.”

Quality Doesn’t have to be an Afterthought

I’d like to begin by offering a resounding THANK YOU to CAST’s worldwide roster of customers and partners. It’s because of you that the good news just keeps coming from CAST!

Forecast Upbeat for CAST