Tag: automated analysis and measurement

For those of us who remember the 90's, two lessons stand out that would be wise to heed in today's highly interconnected technology kitchen:

You Are What You Eat: Secrets to Healthy IT

We know there’s “no such thing as a free lunch,” that “freedom isn’t free” and that if you get something for free, you probably got what you paid for. Even in the tech industry, when we talk about open source software, we immediately think “free”, yet instantly jump to the old caveat of “think free speech, not free beer,” the idea there being that open source is the layer-by-layer developed product of well-intentioned developers seeking to produce high quality software that competes with established applications.

Sibling Rivalry: Code Quality & Open Source

Back in August, "CIO Zone" posted a blog outlining the top five cloud computing trends. Smack-dab in the middle of the top five was this one: "Custom cloud computing services," which delved into how outsourced IT organizations must focus on automated software and become experts in migrating to SaaS, PaaS and IaaS in order to ensure the least painful cloud migrations. It brought to mind how, in an effort to save money, so many businesses blindly hand over their whatever-it-is-to-be-done to outsourcers and hope for the best.

Clouding the Outsourcing Issue

I cannot believe how much our education system has changed. When I went to kindergarten, most of curriculum revolved around getting along with others (a lesson some will argue never took with me) and some basic verbal skills. I learned at my daughter's kindergarten orientation that blocks and finger painting have been replaced by geography, math, science and civics.

Structural Quality Must Be Part of Agile Vocabulary

Bravo to Joe Little, who writes the Agile & Business blog.

Little recently penned a piece about the intersection of Scrum and technical debt titled “Scrum Hates Technical Debt.” I’m sure it does, but I think what he really means is that true Scrum hates technical debt.

Scrum & Technical Debt: Love the One You're With

I’m strictly an “American Car” guy. Every car I’ve ever owned since my 1988 Ford Escort when I was in college has been American made.

It’s not so much that I’m “gung-ho” pro-Union or some staunch advocate of only buying products made in the USA – although if two products were comparable I’d probably give the “Made in the USA” label the nod. Honestly, I’ve looked at foreign vehicles when car shopping, but the best deals I've found continue to come from my local Ford dealer.

Software Quality Haunts Honda

Agile development celebrates a half-birthday this month, so I figured it was time to reflect upon my comments a few months ago when I took it to task for not taking software quality more seriously.

More on Agile at 10…and a Half

“S” stands for security, something “S” organizations like Sony and Sega appeared to have too little of earlier this year. You could also say “S” represents the U.S. Dollar sign ($) that is associated with the FDIC and IRS, both of which have recently fallen victim to phishing attacks and have had their security compromised. Unfortunately, they are not alone; organizations that start with many letters of the alphabet have fallen victim to security issues this year.

Sunny Day, Sweepin’ the Hacks Away

It’s not uncommon for organizations to hold onto their application software and IT systems longer than they should. This is particularly true for government agencies – Federal, state and local. When you combine an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” mentality with budget cuts and comfort levels of staffers, there is little impetus for change.

Patrolling for Issues in Legacy Apps

There’s a huge dichotomy in how the private and public sectors address security breaches.

Execution of Government IT: I’m All For It!

A couple weeks back I read the most vastly understated opening line of a blog that I’ve seen in the six months since I began blogging here on OnQuality.

Blogger @tadanderson, a .NET architect by trade, recently opened a post on his Real World Software Architecture blog by noting, “Finding the perfect balance of influence between IT and the Business Owners… is not easy.”

Technical Debt Gets the Message Across

I’m a big fan of things that make sense. Simple explanations, using metaphors to explain the otherwise inexplicable, incorporating landmarks into driving directions and splitting up large projects to get them done faster are all concepts with which I find favor.

This is why, when I first learned about Scrum, it seemed like a valid way to develop software faster, or at least more efficiently. In my mind, it made sense that if you were to build multiple parts of a single application simultaneously and then bring them together, the final product could be built much faster.

Unscrambling Scrum

Whenever a company chooses to outsource, there is a certain relinquishment of control. It is simply neither possible nor desirable to hold tightly to the reins of all aspects of an outsourced project. It stands to reason, therefore, that studies in the industry have revealed that many in IT management either are dissatisfied with their outsourcers or feel their outsourcers have “made up” work to pad their billings.

New Partnership CASTs Eye on Outsourcing