Category: Software Analysis

When you think about PHP, it is often associated with small applications made by passionate developers for their personal use -- generally websites with low database usage and/or few visitors.

10 tips to speed up your PHP applications

When every product has the same features, the only way to make a difference in the jungle that is today’s software ecosystem is by having the one that performs best. Of course, in this article, by product, we mean application and its code. For .Net applications, this is truer than ever. Here are ten tips that can greatly improve the performance of your .Net application

10 tips that can improve the performance of .Net web applications

False positives are unavoidable and appear in every software application measurement system, with more or less importance. There are several causes to that situation.

False positives in SAM -- Achilles’ heel or Samson's hair?

software quality: Management and development teams put specific processes in place to scan the source code (automatically or not) and control the architecture of the applications they are in charge of. Multiple analyzers are deployed to parse the files that are involved in application implementation and configuration, and they generate results like lists of violations, ranking indexes, quality grades, and health factors.

Use static analysis tools to increase developers’ knowledge

Risk detection is the most valid justification to the Software Analysis and Measurement activity: identify any threat that can negatively and severely impact the behavior of applications in operations as well as the application maintenance and development activity.

Risk Detection and Benchmarking -- Feuding Brothers?

Any advocate for better software quality knows that one of the biggest challenges is helping the CIO reach the CFO. When your team needs a budget for an important project, those conversations often break down. Thanks to the unavoidable technical complexity of IT, oftentimes the CIO might as well be speaking Esperanto to the CFO.

The Tech Babel Fish for CFOs

I’m not one who believes in fortune tellers or those who claim to be able to predict the future. Heck, I don’t even read my horoscope and cringe whenever someone attempts to force it upon me. Only when my wife has attempted to read me my horoscope have I offered even as much as a polite “hmm.” Nevertheless there are many out there who swear by those who claim to be able to predict the future, especially in the financial industry.

Foretelling Facebook’s IPO Failure

Over the past 10 years or so, it has been interesting to watch the metaphor of Technical Debt grow and evolve.  Like most topics or issues in software development, there aren’t many concepts or practices that are fully embraced by the industry without some debate or controversy.  Regardless of your personal thoughts on the topic, you must admit that the concept of Technical Debt seems to resonate strongly outside of development teams and has fueled the imagination of others to expound on the concept and include additional areas such as design debt or other metaphors.  There are now a spate of resources dedicated to the topic including the industry aggregation site:

Gartner Webinar: Get Smart about Technical Debt

I love my job!

I’ve always been an avid writer, even as a kid. So when it came to career choices my decision to enter a profession that demanded writing skills seemed like a natural fit.

I started out as a newspaper reporter, following in my father’s footsteps, but as the jobs and money there began drying up in the mid-1990’s I took my interest in Technology and made the jump to writing for high tech companies and have been happy doing this job ever since.

Quality is a Happy Place

I couldn’t let this week go by without making at least one mention of what is taking place this weekend. This annual event held every year since the year I was born brings most of the United States to a mesmerized halt on the first Sunday in February…and this year I’ll be more mesmerized than I have been the past few years.

Sacking the Hackers

Some among us may remember Earl Scheib who owned a chain of auto painting facilities; at least, that's what he called them. In actual fact, his shops were a national joke. In his TV commercials he would tell viewers, “I’ll paint any car for $99.95” and would promise one-day service. He did just that, but as the old saying goes, "You get what you pay for."

Speed Kills