Category: Application Quality

5 Keys to Optimizing Cost-Effectiveness of Captives

Companies seeking to reduce time to market while improving application quality, today usually choose between assigning application development projects to either in-house teams or outsourced system integrators (SI). However, the cost arbitrage of Global In-House Centers (GIC), better known in the industry as “Captives,” continues to provide advantages in cost competitiveness that cannot be overlooked

Predicting the Future of IT Risk Management with Melinda Ballou

We currently live in a futuristic world that past generations could only dream of. News, weather, updates from friends all over the world come pouring into our computers and smart devices and we don’t even think twice about the IT risk. Whether we’re at home with family, socializing with friends, or even working, technology is constantly surrounding us in one way or another.

Our reliance on technology is so heavy in fact, we often forget about the science behind it and how much goes into the IT risk management to support it. Beneath the surface of our most frequently used apps, social media accounts, games, and programs, highly complex software and code is constantly operating to maintain a satisfied user experience. Even non-tech businesses now realize they would not be able to function in today’s world without effective technological resources.

6 Hidden Costs of Maintaining an Open Source Code Analyzer Platform

So, you’re ready to get started on building your own multi-language custom source code analyzer platform using open source components.  Your return estimates are still looking pretty good, even after taking into account the costs in our previous post, “6 Hidden Costs of Building Your Own Multi-Language Code Analyzer Platform”.

Well, we have a quick list of maintenance costs that you may not have considered.  So, before you break ground on that project, see if you thought of all these.

Does code quality really help the business?

Most organizations have started to realize that code quality is an important root cause to many of their issues, whether it’s incident levels or time to value. The growing complexity of development environments in IT -- the outsourcing, the required velocity, the introduction of Agile -- have all raised the issue about code quality, sometimes to an executive level.

Business applications have always been complex. You can go back to the 70s, even the 60s, and hear about systems that have millions of lines of code. But here’s the rub: In those days it was millions of lines of COBOL or some other language. But it was all one language. All one system. All one single application in a nice, neat, tidy package.

When the software fails, first blame the hardware

We’ve made it a point on our blog to highlight the fact that software glitches in important IT systems -- like NatWest and Google Drive -- can no longer be “the cost of doing business” in this day and age. Interestingly, we’re starting to see another concerning trend: more and more crashes blamed on faulty hardware or network problems, while the software itself is ignored. It’s funny that the difference in incidents can be more than 10 times between applications with similar functional characteristics. Is it possible that the robustness of the software inside the applications has something to do with apparent hardware failures? I think I see a frustrated data center operator reading this and nodding violently.

Remediation cost versus risk level: Two sides of the same coin?

While working in a CISQ technical work group to propose the "best" quality model that would efficiently provide visibility on application quality (mostly to ensure their reliance, performance, and security), we discussed two approaches that would output exposure. The first is a remediation cost approach, which measures the distance to the required internal quality level. The other is a risk level approach, which estimates the impact internal quality issues can have on the business.

  • Does code quality really help the business?

    Most organizations have started to realize that code quality is an important root cause to many of their issues, whether it’s incident levels or time to value. The growing complexity of development environments in IT -- the outsourcing, the required velocity, the introduction of Agile -- have all raised the issue about code quality, sometimes to an executive level.

    Business applications have always been complex. You can go back to the 70s, even the 60s, and hear about systems that have millions of lines of code. But here’s the rub: In those days it was millions of lines of COBOL or some other language. But it was all one language. All one system. All one single application in a nice, neat, tidy package.

  • When the software fails, first blame the hardware

    We’ve made it a point on our blog to highlight the fact that software glitches in important IT systems -- like NatWest and Google Drive -- can no longer be “the cost of doing business” in this day and age. Interestingly, we’re starting to see another concerning trend: more and more crashes blamed on faulty hardware or network problems, while the software itself is ignored. It’s funny that the difference in incidents can be more than 10 times between applications with similar functional characteristics. Is it possible that the robustness of the software inside the applications has something to do with apparent hardware failures? I think I see a frustrated data center operator reading this and nodding violently.

  • Managing Security Risks with the Rise of Mobile and Cloud

    The perimeter surrounding enterprise applications expanded exponentially since the birth of mobile and cloud, and IT security professionals are looking in all the wrong places to try and find a fix. Traditionally, organizations secured their data using a walled off perimeter -- like the walls of a medieval castle -- which contained a multitude of layers to help mitigate the risk of data compromise or exposure. The advent of mobile has altered that landscape dramatically, essentially opening up the front door of the castle and allowing that data to escape into unknown territory -- the mobile device.

  • Why good architecture is a synonym of cost reduction

  • Use static analysis tools to increase developers knowledge

    Static code analysis is used more and more frequently to improve application software quality.
  • Does an IDE improve software quality?

  • Remediation cost versus risk level: Two sides of the same coin?

    While working in a CISQ technical work group to propose the "best" quality model that would efficiently provide visibility on application quality (mostly to ensure their reliance, performance, and security), we discussed two approaches that would output exposure. The first is a remediation cost approach, which measures the distance to the required internal quality level. The other is a risk level approach, which estimates the impact internal quality issues can have on the business.

  • Empowering Developers with System-Level SAM Tools

  • Moving your application to the cloud: Getting ready!

    When we start talking about cloud, several common questions come to mind:

  • Don’t Wait For Load Testing to Find Performance Issues

    We all know testing is an essential step in the application development process. But sometimes testing can feel like your team is just throwing bricks against a wall and seeing when the wall breaks. Wouldn’t it make more sense to be measuring the integrity of the wall itself before chucking things at it?

  • -->