Category: Application Failure

Predicting the Future of IT Risk Management with Melinda Ballou

We currently live in a futuristic world that past generations could only dream of. News, weather, updates from friends all over the world come pouring into our computers and smart devices and we don’t even think twice about the IT risk. Whether we’re at home with family, socializing with friends, or even working, technology is constantly surrounding us in one way or another.

Our reliance on technology is so heavy in fact, we often forget about the science behind it and how much goes into the IT risk management to support it. Beneath the surface of our most frequently used apps, social media accounts, games, and programs, highly complex software and code is constantly operating to maintain a satisfied user experience. Even non-tech businesses now realize they would not be able to function in today’s world without effective technological resources.

American Airlines computer glitch: The day AA customers stood still

Here we go again. You probably have heard, since it’s been reported everywhere, that American Airlines was grounded Tuesday, leaving passengers stranded for several hours due to a “computer glitch” in the reservation system. Because of the glitch, gate agents were unable to print boarding passes; and some passengers described being stuck for long stretches on planes on the runway unable to take off or, having landed, initially unable to move to a gate.

When the software fails, first blame the hardware

We’ve made it a point on our blog to highlight the fact that software glitches in important IT systems -- like NatWest and Google Drive -- can no longer be “the cost of doing business” in this day and age. Interestingly, we’re starting to see another concerning trend: more and more crashes blamed on faulty hardware or network problems, while the software itself is ignored. It’s funny that the difference in incidents can be more than 10 times between applications with similar functional characteristics. Is it possible that the robustness of the software inside the applications has something to do with apparent hardware failures? I think I see a frustrated data center operator reading this and nodding violently.

Load Testing Fails Facebook IPO for NASDAQ

Are you load testing? Great. Are you counting on load testing to protect your organization from a catastrophic system failure? Well, that’s not so great.

Gartner Webinar: Get Smart about Technical Debt

Over the past 10 years or so, it has been interesting to watch the metaphor of Technical Debt grow and evolve.  Like most topics or issues in software development, there aren’t many concepts or practices that are fully embraced by the industry without some debate or controversy.  Regardless of your personal thoughts on the topic, you must admit that the concept of Technical Debt seems to resonate strongly outside of development teams and has fueled the imagination of others to expound on the concept and include additional areas such as design debt or other metaphors.  There are now a spate of resources dedicated to the topic including the industry aggregation site:

  • When the software fails, first blame the hardware

    We’ve made it a point on our blog to highlight the fact that software glitches in important IT systems -- like NatWest and Google Drive -- can no longer be “the cost of doing business” in this day and age. Interestingly, we’re starting to see another concerning trend: more and more crashes blamed on faulty hardware or network problems, while the software itself is ignored. It’s funny that the difference in incidents can be more than 10 times between applications with similar functional characteristics. Is it possible that the robustness of the software inside the applications has something to do with apparent hardware failures? I think I see a frustrated data center operator reading this and nodding violently.

  • Don't Underestimate the Impact of Data Handling

  • Mozzilla Thinks Crashes are a GOOD Thing...Really?

    My six-year-old can tie her own shoes. I honestly did not realize how big of a deal that was until her teacher told me a few months ago that she had, for a short time, become the designated shoe tier in her classroom. Apparently, thanks to the advent of Velcro closures for kids’ shoes, nobody else in her kindergarten class knew how to tie their shoes.

  • Android Application Failures Still Try Our Souls

  • Foretelling Facebook’s IPO Failure

    I’m not one who believes in fortune tellers or those who claim to be able to predict the future. Heck, I don’t even read my horoscope and cringe whenever someone attempts to force it upon me. Only when my wife has attempted to read me my horoscope have I offered even as much as a polite “hmm.” Nevertheless there are many out there who swear by those who claim to be able to predict the future, especially in the financial industry.

  • Load Testing Fails Facebook IPO for NASDAQ

    Are you load testing? Great. Are you counting on load testing to protect your organization from a catastrophic system failure? Well, that’s not so great.

  • Did NASDAQ's App Glitch Cause FB's IPO Hitch?

  • Fix a Hole, Stop a Bug

  • Gartner Webinar: Get Smart about Technical Debt

    Over the past 10 years or so, it has been interesting to watch the metaphor of Technical Debt grow and evolve.  Like most topics or issues in software development, there aren’t many concepts or practices that are fully embraced by the industry without some debate or controversy.  Regardless of your personal thoughts on the topic, you must admit that the concept of Technical Debt seems to resonate strongly outside of development teams and has fueled the imagination of others to expound on the concept and include additional areas such as design debt or other metaphors.  There are now a spate of resources dedicated to the topic including the industry aggregation site:

  • Is your Critical Application the next Titanic?

    Almost everyone has heard about the Titanic and the sinking of the unsinkable.  I guess if you assume your ship is unsinkable, having only 20 lifeboats for a few thousands people seems reasonable.  Maybe it gets overlooked when there are so many important “features” to get right on the maiden voyage.   I’m sure the pressure to ensure the comfort of hundreds of VIP’s must have been immense.  Sometimes it takes a real disaster for change to take place.

  • Replaying the Data Breach Blues

    My tastes in entertainment are pretty broad. While I really enjoy attending sporting events and when Bruce Springsteen is in town I lay aside nearly everything else to attend his concert (as I did in Boston on March 26), I’m also one who enjoys catching a Broadway or Off Broadway Show now and then. In fact, I over the next six weeks I will attend two Red Sox games and two shows at the New World Stages theatre in Midtown.

  • New Year, Same Fear

    I’ve never been much of a horror movie fan. I think my deep-seated love and background of history and my fascination for things that are real diminishes my ability to kick back and allow my wits to be uprooted by monsters and other ghoulish figures like Jason from Friday the 13th or Freddie Krueger from Nightmare on Elm Street.

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