CIO Perspective: Using Software Intelligence to Make Better Modernization Decisions

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Few things move faster in business than change, but among those things are the decisions that drive transformation. The fast pace of decision-making means an organization cannot afford to be scrambling and fumbling for the information it needs to come to its conclusions; it must have the kind of information on-hand that Software Intelligence – insight into complex software structure – provides to ensure execution of the executive process is fast and yields the best possible results.

Because decision-making is at the core of what everyone in an organization must do to be successful, it shouldn’t be rocket science. Nevertheless, Forbes Contributor Erik Larson – a former MIT Rocket Scientist who also holds an MBA from Harvard – said in a 2017 report that for most, decisions are rocket science. He notes, “It's no surprise that our study of 500 managers and executives found 98% fail to apply best practices when making decisions.”

So what can managers and executives do to be part of the “other two-percent?”

Toine van Eeden, CIO at NCOI, a European education company, recently spoke with CAST about how Software Intelligence is vital in furnishing his organization with the knowledge it needs to make its most critical decisions. He says the metrics extracted from the analytics of Software Intelligence make the organization’s judgements faster and more efficient.

“Software Intelligence is a means to get information for decision making,” says van Eeden. “Our organization is growing very rapidly; we have a lot of decisions to make and no time to waste.”

Business growth is always the ultimate goal for a company, but with growth comes the demand for an organization to do things quicker and make its products more robust. This places an even greater reliance upon information to accelerate IT modernization efforts.

“Besides quicker, they want us to be able to be changing sooner – to be agile,” says van Eeden. “Software Intelligence gave us the metrics to do so because we’re in such strong control of what we do it allows us to shift abruptly.”

NCOI employs Software Intelligence beyond applications that are developed in-house. The organization also uses this insight into complex software for greater supply chain transparency.

"Software development, custom applications, applications we bought, web services and this kind of thing – we use Software Intelligence for the complete spectrum of what we do,” says van Eeden. “Old methodologies, new methodologies, old systems and new systems, we use it everywhere.”

Not every piece of information NCOI takes from Software Intelligence is a revelation. van Eeden says often the details “are all things we know, but just in a different commercial framework.” Still, he says the company relies upon what it learns from Software Intelligence, even if it’s when the company is undergoing its own digital transformation to DevOps.

“The new methodologies often don’t work as well as the old ones, and combining waterfall and agile makes the whole project better,” says van Eeden. “Agile doesn’t really have an objective way to measure productivity or planning, and we use tools like CAST’s Application Intelligence Platform to make everything more predictable.”

And while individuals may find “predictable” to be “boring,” in business, the foresight of predictability leads to the kind of informed decision-making that “schools” the competition.

You can watch van Eeden’s full take on Software Intelligence for decision-making here.

Tagged: Agile DevOps
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Jonathan Bloom Writer, Blogger & PR Consultant
Jonathan is an experienced writer with over 20 years writing about the Technology industry. Jon has written more than 750 journal and magazine articles, blogs and other materials that have been published throughout the U.S. and Canada. He has expertise in a wide range of subjects within the IT industry including software development, enterprise software, mobile, database, security, BI, SaaS/Cloud, Health Care IT and Sustainable Technology. In his free time, Jon enjoys attending sporting events, cooking, studying American history and listening to Bruce Springsteen music.
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