The Software Intelligence Blog

Tag: software development

  • QAI QUEST: Fixing Quality Issues with Automated Code Review

    Recently I had the pleasure of speaking at QAI QUEST 2016, which showcases the latest techniques for software quality measurement and testing. It was a content-rich program with more than three days of diving deep into issues like DevOps, Open Source, Security Mobile and more. But what struck me the most above all the event chatter is that even the brightest of companies are still having a difficult time identifying and fixing code quality errors.

  • Using Code Quality Metrics to Improve Application Performance

    For years refactoring software has been a common process used to improve the quality, efficiency, and maintainability of an application. However, a recent article by IT World discusses how CIOs may not be getting a valuable return on their investment of time and effort into the refactoring process. While many believe refactoring reduces the risk of future headaches, new findings acquired through a study by Sri Lanka researchers suggests code quality is not improved significantly by refactoring.

  • Software Risk: Executive Insights on Application Resiliency

    Software risks to the business, specifically Application Resiliency, headline a recent executive roundtable hosted by CAST and sponsored by IBM Italy, ZeroUno and the Boston Consulting Group.  European IT executives from the financial services industry assembled to debate the importance of mitigating software risks to their business.

  • Faltering Software Quality and Standards: Why Programmers Should Stop Calling Themselves Engineers

    In the current tech scene, it has become common practice to refer to programmers as engineers. It seems that if you aren't part of sales or marketing teams you are now entitled to being designated as an engineer. However, what has been forgotten over the 50 years of looking to turn software development into a legitimate engineering practice, is that we still haven't reached the aspiration of being just that: a legitimate engineering practice. Traditional engineers have to go through stringent regulation, certification, and apprenticeships in order to gain the title. This creates an implicit responsibility of providing reliability and public safety. Software development hasn't reached this point yet - software quality and standards are not universally valued.

    So why is the tech industry using the engineering title to describe its technical workers?

  • Agile Introduction: Are You a Laggard?

    The purpose of this white paper is to portray the worldwide state of agile adoption for our readers. While much has been written about the strengths and weaknesses of the technology, little data has been published to show how widely agile methods are used. This paper corrects that by providing data from our databases for public consumption. As shown in Figure 1, agile methods have become the dominant software development paradigm used throughout the world based on data from 330 organizations. Some of these organizations are offshoots of the 120 firms and government organizations from which we have received data. Figure 2 summarizes which agile methodologies are in use by these organizations. As many said that they were using a hybrid approach, i.e., one that combined agile with traditional concepts, we have included their response and categorized them as either hybrid or hybrid/lean (agile combined with lean).

  • Software Risk Driven Application Development

  • Function Points, Software Analytics and Much More! Join Us in DC on June 2nd

    Join software measurement practitioners from government and industry at an event on June 2nd just outside of Washington DC. Discussion topics to include: the use of software analytics in all areas of enterprise program and development management, software measurement, automated function points, and software productivity management.

  • Modernize QA with Automated Structural Quality Gates

    Just like a species of insects can become resistant to a certain type of pesticide, a new strain of software bugs has emerged and is plaguing software developers and wreaking havoc on software quality -- architecturally complex violations. Unlike a code-level bug, a system level defect involves interactions between several components, often spread across different levels of an application, making them much more difficult to find and fix.

    And even though these types of violations only account for 10 percent of the total number of defects, they lead to ninety percent of the production issues -- severely impacting software quality and technical debt.

  • Executive IT Decision Making: Am I Properly Measuring IT Risk?

    Business decisions made in organizations today are moving away from a gut feeling and more towards data-driven, objective decision making. But what can IT do to prepare? For IT to have true visibility and scientific decision-making into their application development they need to have a view at the end product itself -- its stability, robustness, performance, security, and development velocity.

  • Executives, Management, and Testers: Are You Aligned?

    What draws me to Anaheim, Calif., in October is not the walking Disney characters (though there are plenty of those), but instead the STARWest, the West Coast’s largest conference on software testing analysis and review.

  • Extending Agile To The Left

    At a time when other conferences are splitting into smaller and smaller regional and micro-tech events, the Agile Conference, with its 1,700 attendees, stands alone.

    Alone and overwhelming. The event had sixteen different tracks spanning everything from DevOps to coaching and mentoring, leadership, and lean startup to classic elements like development, testing, and quality assurance.

    Not to mention the vendor booths, the Stalwarts Stage (where experts "just" answered questions for 75 minutes), the four-day boot camp for beginners, and the academic track. The 215 sessions brought one word to mind: overwhelming.

    Instead of focusing on one track or concept, I spent my time at the conference looking for themes and patterns. What surprised me was where I found those ideas -- to the left, in product design, and to the right, in DevOps, not in the middle, in classic software.

  • Maintaining software quality on the bleeding edge

    From IT’s perspective, the business is always asking for new applications -- apps to innovate, or simply make their jobs a little easier. The problem is, it always want them done quickly and be up and running perfectly at launch.

  • Raymond James’ Aha! Moment with Integrating Software Quality

    When my organization decided to hire a new CTO, one of his top priorities was to look through our old support contracts and “cut the fat,” as it were. It was there, among the rubble, where we found a transformational tool that we had cast aside which could help us increase our development productivity and software quality. But in learning more about this tool we found that it hadn’t failed us, but rather, we failed it!

  • How to Build the Best Action Plan for your Application

    Applications are built on thousands, millions, maybe even tens of millions, lines of code. They are based on specific architecture gathering technologies, frameworks, and databases set up with their own specific architecture. If you have an action plan to improve your application on a specific issue, what will be your strategy?

  • Empowering Developers with System-Level SAM Tools

    The analogy between brick-and-mortar building architecture and software architecture is used quite often. Although they are quite different, this still helps to remind us that in software engineering everything is interdependent with a crucial cause-effect factor, which is actually thousands of times more sensitive than in hardware construction.

  • Cracking Open the Black Box of IT for CEOs

    I spend some of my time with CEOs or CFOs, and time and again they tell me that IT is a black box that’s difficult, if not impossible, to measure. They can’t measure productivity. They can’t measure output. They can’t measure outcomes. They can’t measure risk. But, the thing they can measure is the IT cost.

  • 3 Simple Tips to Maintaining a Rock-Solid Software Architecture

    I have some good news and I have some bad news. First, the good news: Most smart development teams invest a lot of time designing a rock-solid architecture before the first line of code is even written for a new application. Now, the bad news: Once the architecture is designed, the conversation about it often ends. It’s built and then forgotten while the team runs off and builds the app, or when the application is transferred to a new development team.

  • Agile has replaced waterfall, but have quality outcomes changed?

    The software industry is moving very quickly from the traditional waterfall model to the agile methodology. We’re certainly producing software more quickly, but is the software we’re producing any better? Before we get into that though, let’s look at the reasons for this shift in mindset from waterfall to agile.

  • Fast or Nimble? Agile Should be Both

    I was watching the gymnastics competition at the Olympics on Sunday night and on more than one occasion heard commentators applaud competitors for their agility. As I watched these gymnasts move swiftly and with exacting precision across the beam, floor, vault and bars, I could not help but marvel at their abilities and at how appropriate a descriptor “agile” was for them.

  • Bridging the Gap between Functional and Technical: A Telecom Story

    For IT software development, there are few industries as challenging as the telecommunications industry. Telecom service providers rely on sophisticated software for the management of their network as well as for all their key operations, like accurately billing customers for their phone calls and internet access, and taking good care of their clients.